The risk of HIV and hepatitis B infection to the medical staff during surgery .

Category:

Research type: Research Paper

Authors: El Sanousi, Osama Mohamed .

Abstract: This prospective hospital-based study was conducted at Khartoum Teaching Hospital, Khartoum - Sudan during the period between January 1996 to June 1996. It included 209 patients undergone general surgical operations lasting more than 30 minutes. Also included in this study 67 doctors in the departments of general surgery in the same hospital and during that period. The objectives of the study were to calculate the incidence of incidental injuries and mucocutaneous splashes sustained by the surgical staff during those operations, to calculate the prevalence of HIV infection and hepatitis B among those patients and to estimate the state of vaccination against hepatitis B among the doctors in the surgical department. The rate of incidental injuries documented in this study was 11.3 injuries per 100 operative hours and 72.1 percent were due to needle sticks. The rate of mucocutaneous contacts was found to be 15.3 per 100 operative hour; 72.4 percent of them were due to gloves perforation. One percent of the patients were HIV seropositive. Only 11.9 percent of the surgical staff are fully vaccinated. These results conclude that the incidence of incidental injuries and mucocutaneous contacts is high; the incidence of HIV infection and hepatitis B is increasing and the vaccination against hepatitis B among the operative staff is defective. The overall risk to the surgical staff is very high. In order to avoid disastrous consequences of Hepatitis B and HIV infection, surgical staff should always follow the safe operative techniques and use appropriate protective devices. Pre- and post- operative hepatitis B immunization should be provided for the staff..